× You are not currently logged in. To receive all the benefits our site has to offer, we encourage you to log in now.

Insights & Solutions

Slidecast
January 2021 Slidecast

Lednicky, J. A., Lauzardo, M., Hugh Fan, Z., Jutla, A., Tilly, T. B., Gangwar, M., Usmani, M., Shankar, S. N., Mohamed, K., Eiguren-Fernandez, A., Stephenson, C. J., Alam, M. M., Elbadry, M. A., Loeb, J. C., Subramaniam, K., Waltzek, T. B., Cherabuddi, K., Glenn Morris, J., & Wu, C. Y. (2020). Viable SARS-CoV-2 in the air of a hospital room with COVID-19 patients. International Journal of Infectious Diseases

There has been ongoing debate about how SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted – is it just droplets? Or does it also transmit by air? Lednicky and colleagues developed a sampling method to test air in a shared patient room with COVID19-positive patients. The air samplers were located at a distance greater than 6’ from the patients. The results showed a complete sequence of SARS-CoV-2 collected from an air sample was an exact match with the virus isolated from patient 1. This study does clearly suggest there is an inhalation risk for acquiring COVID-19 beyond the 6’ practice of physical or social distancing. For designers, aerosolization raises questions about HVAC systems and air changes, but since HVAC design wasn’t the purpose of this study, we know we need to continue to work with engineering professional to establish how to best mitigate transmission by air.

Slidecast
January 2021 Slidecast

Mills, P. D., C. Soncrant, J. Bender, and W. Gunnar. “Impact of Over-the-Door Alarms: Root Cause Analysis Review of Suicide Attempts and Deaths on Veterans Health Administration Mental Health Units.” General Hospital Psychiatry 64

In order to reduce inpatient suicide, ligature resistance has been a focus of CMS and accrediting organizations for the past several years, but questions remain as to how far we go and where the real risks lie. In this study based in the Veterans Administration, researchers conducted a retrospective review and analysis of system-wide data of suicide deaths and attempts. As with other studies, the majority of suicides or attempts involved hanging, most of which used doors as the anchor point. Of events where the patient was using a door, more than a third involved an over-the-door alarm (OTD), and none of those events included a death. While correlation does not prove causation, the results suggest that OTD alarms prevented death. Knowing the alarm might alert staff became part of the deterrent. Quite simply, in mental health units where the risk of patients committing suicide is high, OTD alarms may help save lives, as part of a comprehensive strategy that includes sight lines, rounding, ongoing maintenance, and even ligature resistant bedding.

Slidecast
January 2021 Slidecast

Momeni, M., Jamshidimanesh, M., & Ranjbar, H. (2020). Effectiveness of a Snoezelen Room on fear, anxiety, and satisfaction of nulliparous women: A randomized controlled trial. Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

We have a number of studies looking at the influence of room design on birth and birthing outcomes, but understanding any implications of room design are important because it potentially influences the health of both the mom and baby. The researchers conducted a 13-month randomized control trial with first-time mothers who were either in a standard room or a multi-sensory room. The multi-sensory room included aspects of sight, sound and smell. Measures were taken before, during, and after birth. During the birthing, the fear score went down with every measurement phase in the sensory room while it went up in every phase in the standard room. Results also showed that the mean score of anxiety decreased across all phases in the multi-sensory room. In addition, the total mean score of birth satisfaction was 163 in the intervention room and only about 75 in the control room. This study addresses cultural context, but it also takes what we know about positive distractions and pain and what we know about multi-sensory environments and the regulation of behavior, and applies that evidence in a different setting – one for birth.

 

Workshop
May 2020 Workshop
The Workshop 

Don’t miss this, high-return day to problem-solve with experts, idea-share with colleagues and obtain new strategies and resources to address behavioral health challenges not only in specialized units, but in emergency departments, outpatient clinics and throughout acute care settings. 

Buy Pass
Webinar
December 2020 Webinar
This webinar will describe the evolution of their community health centers by identifying key transformative moments in care delivery and explaining how those were implemented in the physical clinics, as well as how each new clinic design afforded an opportunity to innovate care practices.   
Buy Pass
Webinar
December 2020 Webinar
Join this webinar and hear how the innovation supporting this care model emerged, case study best practices, and next steps for this model moving forward.  
Member Project
December 2020 Member Project
The 12,500 SF unit was designed and constructed in just 120 days and incorporates all of the planned care and documentation practices to support the Western Maryland community during the COVID-19 pandemic and future events as they may occur. The negative-pressure and ventilator-capable environment was designed adjacent to outpatient facilities and increases the overall capacity of available beds, while limiting the exposure of the infected patients. The unit features two operating modes: “normal,” where the rooms function as typical medical/surgical beds; and “infectious,” where all 20 rooms operate under negative pressure to care for infected patients and provide clinical safety.
Slidecast
December 2020 Slidecast

King, B., Bodden, J., Steege, L., & Brown, C. J. (2020). Older adults experiences with ambulation during a hospital stay: A qualitative study. Geriatric Nursing

The inability to independently ambulate during an admission frequently results in “hospital associated disability” for older adults. Understanding and addressing ambulatory barriers from their point of view is essential to facilitate better outcomes. Focus groups were conducted to solicit and categorize responses. Researchers uncovered a new place-based concept that they referred to as “Danger Zones.” Unwelcoming environments, inadequate care planning, and interpersonal biases all contribute to challenges with older patient’s lack of ambulation. This study provides a prototype for identifying barriers to ambulation in healthcare settings from the perspective of older adults as well as a broader range of inpatients.

Slidecast
December 2020 Slidecast

Martins, B. A., Barrie, H., Visvanathan, R., Daniel, L., Martins, L. A., Ranasinghe, D., Wilson, A., & Soebarto, V. (2020). A multidisciplinary exploratory approach for investigating the experience of older adults attending hospital services. HERD: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, in press.

For older adults, unsupportive healthcare settings present barriers to accessing medical care. While previous studies have primarily been focused on inpatient or emergency care areas, this study contributes insight about ambulatory and public areas. A multidisciplinary research team used a mixed-method triangulated approach to compare older patient’s experiences, perceptions, and capabilities with age-friendly environmental features. This study provides a model for future research to explore the experience of ambulation from the perspective of older patients in other settings and with a broader range of participants.

Slidecast
December 2020 Slidecast

Lorusso, L., Park, N.-K., Bosch, S., Freytes, I. M., Shorr, R., Conroy, M., & Ahrentzen, S. (2020). Sensory environments for behavioral health in Dementia: Diffusion of an environmental innovation at the Veterans Health Administration. HERD: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, in press.

People with dementia react poorly to environmental stress which increases caregiver burden. Nonpharmacological treatments may help treat symptoms for veterans who are twice as likely to suffer from dementia and behavioral disturbances. Researchers interviewed staff in 12 of the Veterans Health Administration’s Community Living Centers to investigate the therapeutic value and veteran’s preference for multi-sensory environmental equipment within fixed room or mobile cart applications. Analysis revealed variable equipment prioritization.  Designers may facilitate increased access, greater flexibility, and stability to application by finding innovative ways to incorporate these elements into common spaces.